High Pollution Advisory

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality has not issued a High Pollution Advisory for today.
Please see the information and resources below to learn more about High Pollution Advisory Days and the steps you can take to help prevent air pollution.

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) issues High Pollution Advisory (HPA) when levels of ozone and/or particulate matter (PM) are expected to exceed the federal health standard.

The ADEQ recommends that the general public limit outdoor activity while the HPA is in effect, especially children and adults with respiratory problems.

What is Ozone and Particulate Matter?

Ozone

Ground level ozone is formed by a chemical reaction among sunlight, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

PM-10 and PM-2.5

Particulate matter (PM) is extremely small solid particles and liquid droplets that circulate in air. Particulate matter comes from combustion (cars, industry, wood burning) or dust stirred up into the air. High levels of particulate matter occur when air is especially stagnant or windy. Two types of particulate matter are measured by state and county agencies: PM-10 refers to dust particles 10 microns or less and PM-2.5 to soot particles 2.5 microns or less. People with heart or lung diseases, older adults and children are most likely to be affected by particle pollution.

What can I do to make a difference?

  • Drive as little as possible: carpool or use public transit. For information on transportation alternatives, visit Valley Metro's Share the Ride.
  • Fuel your vehicle after dark or during cooler evening hours.
  • Use low-VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) or water-based paints, stains, finishes and paint strippers.
  • Delay big painting projects until high pollution advisories or health watches have passed.
  • Make sure containers of household cleaners, garage and yard chemicals and other solvents are sealed properly to prevent vapors from evaporating into the air.
  • Eliminate wood burning in fireplaces, stoves, chimineas, and outdoor fire pits.
  • Avoid using leaf blowers.
  • Conserve electricity.
  • Recreational off-highway vehicle use is prohibited during the advisory period.
  • Drive as little as possible: carpool or use public transit. For information on transportation alternatives, visit Valley Metro's Share the Ride.
  • Reduce your time waiting in long drive-through lines. For example, at coffee shops, fast-food restaurants or banks, park your car and go inside.
  • Fuel your vehicle after dark or during cooler evening hours.
  • Avoid using leaf blowers.
  • Use low-VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) or water-based paints, stains, finishes and paint strippers.
  • Delay big painting projects until high pollution advisories or health watches have passed.
  • Make sure containers of household cleaners, garage and yard chemicals and other solvents are sealed properly to prevent vapors from evaporating into the air.
  • Eliminate wood burning in fireplaces, stoves, chimineas, and outdoor fire pits.
  • Conserve electricity.
  • Avoid activities that generate dust, such as driving on dirt roads.
  • Stabilize loose soils.
  • Eliminate fireplace and wood stove use.
  • Avoid activities that generate dust, such as driving on dirt roads.
  • Stabilize loose soils.
  • Eliminate fireplace and wood stove use.
  • Avoid using leaf blowers.
  • Use electric lawn and garden equipment.
  • Drive as little as possible: carpool, use public transit, or telecommute. For information on transportation alternatives, visit Share the Ride.
  • Recreational off-highway vehicle use is prohibited during the advisory period.
  • Drive as little as possible: carpool, or use public transit. For information on transportation alternatives, visit Share the Ride.
  • Stabilize loose soils.
  • Eliminate fireplace and wood stove use.
  • Recreational off-highway vehicle use is prohibited during the advisory period.
  • Avoid activities that generate dust, such as driving on dirt roads.
  • Avoid using gas-powered lawn and garden equipment.
  • The use of leaf blowers on governmental properties is prohibited during the advisory period.

The Maricopa County Air Quality Department (MCAQD) may also declare a No Burn Day in Maricopa County, and the following mandatory restrictions will be in effect:

  • Open burning activity is restricted in Maricopa County. This includes individuals and businesses which have burn permits for open burning.
  • Employees and contractors of government entities are prohibited from operating leaf blowers.
  • Off-highway vehicles are prohibited from being used.

Resources